Sunday, September 8

More Color

After not using color for a long time have reintroduced it in these very recent paintings done in August 2019.



Forest Gnome Cupid

The rastered forest gnome holds the key to love. Cupid on its left, broken heart on its right.





Collaborative Painting Project



This painting is the result of a collaboration  with Cristina Blanch https://www.instagram.com/cristinablanch_art/ . It is the first painting we've collaborated on together and using Vigeé Le Brun, the 18th French portrait painter portraits as a starting point.


Cristina, a phenomenally talented painter at work on another collaborative work

Titian

 Based on a ''Mars Venus and Cupid'' by Titian


Color


Studio view of recent work summer of 2019.  Introducing color again.








Love's Not Love?


The two paintings with mother and child are based on Vigeé Le Brun portraits 18th century French portrait painter of French aristocracy. Most of her subjects were murdered in the French Revolution.  
Is Carnal love, love? Or, love's not love?

When does Cupid appear normally?

Love is a doughnut?


Queens Are Kings. Probably.

"Once Upon A Time''. Has to do with lost love.  For me it's not pornographic. Carnal love is one kind of love.  Love is love?

Mortadello

Mortadelo is a Spanish comic icon by Ibañez.  It's as Spanish as you can get. Like jamon Serrano or tortilla.


Thursday, June 6

Installation View Expo @ Cora Egger, 06/06/19, Barcelona




LOVE´S NOT LOVE, title of the exhibition at Atelier Cora Eggers, June 6, 2019, Barcelona.
Deals loosley with the theme of love in some of its aspects: carnal love, lost love, promised love; and the related theme of power and morbidity.














Friday, March 22

The Kiss


''The Kiss''. 
200 x 150 cm 79 x 59'' painted drawing on paper, spring, 2019 



                                     

Rip it Out Baby!

''Rip it Out Baby!'' Rastered forest gnome has a knife in its left hand and bleeding heart in its right.
200 x 150 cm 79 x 59'' painted drawing on paper, 2019





Gnome BBQ Deer

''Gnome BBQ Deer''
Elf is BBQing a steak both present and future.  The future is the deer.  We are all elves unconsciously consuming the world and leaving nothing in its place.
200 x 150 cm 79 x 59'' painted drawing on paper, 2019

Beavers R Cute

''Beavers R Cute''
Well, Beavers are cute. Aren't they? 
200 x 150 cm 79 x 59'' painted drawing on paper, 2018


Wood Gnome

This is the first rastered gnome I painted based on an animated Once pixel board ad here in Barcelona (Once is an association for the blind in Spain).  I was taken by the gnome which in the ad was really an elf, one of Santa's helpers, for a Xmas promotion to by lottery tickets.  I'd see the pixel board everyday on the Ferrocarril (commuter train). I had to paint it. It took me like 20 years to get it right. 
200 x 150 cm 79 x 59'' painted drawing on paper, 2019

Leaders Aren't Made, They are Created

''Leaders Aren't Made, They are Created''
Was thinking of Tr**p, you know, the President of the US, can't even write his name --the nausea. Beaver gets magical powers to become a great leader.  But it is still a beaver. Sound familiar?  
200 x 150, 79 x 59'' painted drawing on paper, 2018





Monday, July 17

The Cottage


In 2015/16 did a whole series of small works on wood dealing with the idea of freedom.  Consists of a cottage and a rabbit.  Here the rabbit disappears and only the cottage remains.
60 x 40 cm mixed media. 

Friday, October 30

"Oh my Ears, my Whiskers" 4

Same series of paintings here with rabbit and cottage. Rabbits are a constant theme and I wanted a narrative using a cottage. This series of works was a return to "narrative painting" for me and the seed of the work I am doing now.
60 x 40 cm, mixed media.  

Saturday, June 6

Monday, May 25

Monday, March 23

Monday, June 16

Going Abstract
















When I moved to NY in 1997 I decided to change my work. Since I had decided to change my life, the change in my painting seemed logical.  The move was quite radical and I started from zero in NY. I was quite well set-up in Barcelona and very comfortable there when I left.  NY was necessary to start fresh and leave the pop images behind and just concentrate on painting what I loved, which was abstraction.  That work culminated in a show in Barcelona at Galeria Victor Saavedra in 2000, where I showed these and other works. Sometimes you do what you think you should do rather than being true to yourself and what feels right.  Although I love abstraction, I couldn't get it right.  I was always feeling like something was missing. And it was. It was the narrative, the irony, the imagery. 

Exterminating Angels






































This is work from around 1995. I used to go to this junk store around the corner from my studio in the Raval, which was called the Barrio Chino back then, but now they (El Ayuntamiento, ie. City Hall) have sanitized both name and hood after tearing-down the worst parts of the neighborhood and eliminating a lot of the marginal activities like prostitution, drug dealing and whatever else. That still goes on, but it is nothing like it was. Anyways, I'd go to this junk shop around the corner when I was stuck in the studio and I would find curious stuff, like old photos, figurines, etc. I found this cheesy cast figure of an angel with a movable head that I painted and these are the outcome. The painting with the male figure is Brains from the Thunderbirds, which was another series of paintings I did but fits with this theme.  
All these paintings are 230 x 170cm.  I believe one of these paintings was shown at Galleria Tomas Carsten in Barcelona in 1995 -- the angel with the turquoise background. The three works  are in private collections in Barcelona.

Mortadelo and Filemon




































When I moved to Barcelona in 1988, the city was a very out-of-the-way-place. An alternative, unknown quantity, very authentic, and for me quite exotic in its authenticity. I came from Toronto, an anodyne and pale landscape, and no real painting going on. I felt like the good painting was going on elsewhere.
I knew instinctively even before coming to Barcelona that there was nothing going on as far as visual art. Well, there were things going on but they definitely weren't very interesting as far as painting, or seeing paintings, or finding good galleries was concerned. A lack of solidarity between artists and few collectors meant everyone starved or fought for the small slice of something that was there. That was fine for me. Sailor bars, junkies, and locals. Real stuff in your face. That was inspiring if not disturbing. I developed my work and isolate myself from my surroundings. One of the things that grabbed my eye was the comic book "Mortadelo and Filemon", quintessentially Spanish, and for me very interesting visually to look at. I wandered around my neighborhood, looking at stuff. It wasn't the comic parse that I liked, but the covers, which were well displayed in the kiosks on the Ramblas.  That was a continuous presence and something very native and pop. The more I looked at it the more I wanted to paint the frenetic warped surreal scenes and the bright, garish colors. I did end up painting Mortadelo and Filemon. Well, just Mortadelo -- 230 x 170 cm size in oil. 
At the time, 1988-94, there were some good painting shows passing through Barcelona. Bits and bobs at the Caixa Forum.  Really some great shows: Howard Hodgkin, the German painters like Keifer, Ed Ruscha, Sigmar Polke and others.  The two paintings in the photo are installation shots from the show I did at the now defunct Carles Poy Gallery in 1993, in Barcelona.

Psyco-Bunnies
















The bunny portraits are installation shots from the expo at Carles Poy Gallery, Barcelona in 1993.
The two painting below are 230 x 175  cm of the cosmic bunnies series that I did afterwards. I showed the one with the bluish ground at Kiku Mistu Centro del Arte, Barcelona in 1996, and subsequently sold both of them privately.  The cosmic bunnies were a culmination of the pop work I developed in Barcelona from 1988 to 97, before I left for NY.





Sunday, June 15

A FOR-REAL Painter -- the real MacCoy







This image is of one of his amazing paintings. And it is a painting, not a piece of sterling board, although you wouldn't know it. A real challenge to our notion of reality as it is perceived, and to our expectations of how things really are and not how they just appear to be.










Rory Macbeth.  Was once a Street Painter who I met in Barcelona in 1988. Phenomenal painter, phenomenally talented.  Now he shows all over the place aside from being one of the organizers of Pilot, in London, an archive and showcase of unrepresented artists, and now the dean of fine arts at Liverpool University.